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27.12.49

Just to start


Right now I am going to teach you four very common expressions:

a

a
Mattino Morning

Buon giorno Good morning



Pomeriggio Afternoon

Buon Pomeriggio Good afternoon



Sera Evening

Buona sera Good evening



Notte Night

Buona notte Good night



Also, see : Greetings and parting expressions

For now it is all but see you at the next little lesson.

13.12.49

Let's go on!



Yes

Io
I

io sono I am

io sono inglese I am English

io sono francese I am French

io sono portoghese I am Portuguese






Drops of grammar

You have to know that in Italian the first person singular "io" (unlike the first person singular in English) has to be written with a small initial letter, exception made when "io" is put at the beginning of a sentence and after:

  • a full point (.)

  • a question mark (?)

  • an exclamation mark (!)

For now that's all, see you at the next little lesson.

7.12.49

The present tense of the verb "essere" "to be"



At this point let's learn the present tense of the verb "essere" "to be"



Io sono _I am



Tu sei /Lei è _You are



Egli è _He is



Ella è _She is



Esso é _It is



Noi siamo _We are



Voi siete _You are



Essi sono _They are






Drops of grammar

In Italian the second person singular is constituted by two forms: "Tu" and "Lei".


You say "Tu" to:
  • a member of the family,


  • a friend,


  • a young person


  • a kid.


You say "Lei" to:
a person that you don't know well (acquaintance) or someone older than you.
















For now that's all, see you at the next little lesson.

16.11.49

The present tense of the verb "essere" "to be"


Negative form:



Io non sono I am not



Tu non sei/Lei non è You are not



Egli non è He is not



Ella non è She is not



Esso non è It is not



Noi non siamo We are not



Voi non siete You are not



Essi non sono They are not



Unlike English, in which "not" is put after the forms of "to be", in Italian "non" is placed before the forms of "essere".


Also, see the present tense of the verb "avere" "to have": negative form

For now that's all, see you at the next little lesson.

2.11.49

The present tense of the verb "essere" "to be"



Interrogative form:



Sono io? Am I?



Sei tu?/É lei? Are you?



É lui? Is he?



É lei? Is she?



É esso? Is it?



Siamo noi? Are we?



Siete voi? Are you?



Sono loro? Are they?




Drops of grammar


  • In the interrogative form, putting the verb before the subject or vece versa after, is the same thing. Then you can also say:

____Io sono?

____Tu sei?/Lei è?

____Lui è?

____Lei é?

____Esso é?

____Noi siamo?

____Voi siete?

____Loro sono?






  • You have to know that (in general for all the verb conjugations) you can often omit the subject, for example instead of saying "io sono" you can just say "sono", instead of saying "noi siamo" you can just say "siamo", instead of saying "siete voi?" you can just say "siete?" and so on. This can be done, because the form itself of the verb identifies the subject.


Also, see the present tense of "essere" "to be": negative-interrogative form

and the present tense of "avere" "to have": interrogative form

For now that's all, see you at the next litle lesson.

18.10.49

Italian alphabet



The Italian alphabet is constituted by 21 letters:



A a

B bi

C ci

D di

E e


G gi


I i




O o

P pi

Q qu



T ti

U u

V vi or vu





There are also 5 more non Italian letters (they integrate the Italian alphabet) used to spell out foreign words:


J i lunga


K cappa


W doppia vi or doppia vu


X ics


Y ipsilon


For now that's all, see you at the next little lesson.

3.10.49

Numbers

Shall we go on?

Let's learn to count from zero to ten.

0

Zero

Zero

1

Uno

One

2

Due

Two

3

Tre

Three

4

Quattro

Four

5

Cinque

Five

6

Sei

Six

7

Sette

Seven

8

Otto

Eight

9

Nove

Nine

10

Dieci

Ten

For now that's all, see you at the next little lesson.